peculiarcuriosities:

"Many animals were used during WW1. Horses, mules, dogs and pigeons were vulnerable to poison gases so that special protection was necessary for them. Horses were equipped with gas masks over their muzzles and were protected from inhalation of poison gases such as phosgene. Equine eyes were not affected by lachrymatory agents so that their masks consisted only of specially made nose bags but, unfortunately, these animal’s eyes were vulnerable to the effects of chlorine and vesicatory gases. Of the million British horses sent overseas to help with the war effort, only 62,000 returned home. This is the forgotten tragedy of the Great War – a conflict that pitched as many animals into the line of fire as it did humans. For years few knew of the unimaginable suffering of the beasts transported across the Channel to the Western Front."

peculiarcuriosities:

"Many animals were used during WW1. Horses, mules, dogs and pigeons were vulnerable to poison gases so that special protection was necessary for them. Horses were equipped with gas masks over their muzzles and were protected from inhalation of poison gases such as phosgene. Equine eyes were not affected by lachrymatory agents so that their masks consisted only of specially made nose bags but, unfortunately, these animal’s eyes were vulnerable to the effects of chlorine and vesicatory gases. Of the million British horses sent overseas to help with the war effort, only 62,000 returned home. This is the forgotten tragedy of the Great War – a conflict that pitched as many animals into the line of fire as it did humans. For years few knew of the unimaginable suffering of the beasts transported across the Channel to the Western Front."

deaths-praises:

First World War
German infantrymen attack through a cloud of poison gas. By the end of the war, both sides had employed various kinds of gas

deaths-praises:

"I don’t think I could stand any more. I had always hoped that my war experiences would, despite their misery and bitterness, act as a stimulus to my spiritual life, would heighten my compassion, would “strengthen my soul in all goodness.” But now I wanted to find a quiet spot where the world was at peace."
-

Florence Farmborough, November 1917

from The Beauty and The Sorrow by Peter Englund

peter englund the beauty and the sorrow women in the first world war history

"The dead were still lying around, in strange, unnatural postures - remaining where they had fallen: crouching, doubled up, stretched out, prostrate, prone…Austrians and Russians lying side by side. And there were lacerated crushed bodies lying on darkly stained patches of earth. There was on Austrian without a leg and with blacked, swollen face; another with a smashed face, terrible to look at; a Russian soldier with legs doubled under him, leaning against the barbed wire… Those “heaps” were once human beings: men who were young, strong and vigorous; now they lay lifeless and inert; shapeless forms of what had been living flesh and bone. What a frail and fragile thing is human life!"
-

Florence Farmborough, August 1916

— from The Beauty and The Sorrow by Peter Englund

the beauty and the sorrow peter englund history women in the first world war

"Beautiful women and fast women should be locked up. Let men meet their God with their conscience clear. Most of them will be killed before the war is over. Surely the least we can do is not to offer them temptation. Death and destruction, and horror and wonderful heroism, seem so near and so transcendent, and then, quite close at hand, one finds evil doings."
-

Sarah Mcnaughtan, May 1915

— from The Beauty and The Sorrow by Peter Englund

the beauty and the sorrow peter englund women in the first world war ww1 history

"See that little stream - we could walk to it in two minutes. It took the British a month to walk to it - a whole empire walking very slowly, dying in front and pushing forward behind. And another empire walked very slowly backward a few inches a day, leaving the dead like a million bloody rags. No European will ever do that again in this generation."
- F. Scott Fitzgerald, August 1918

f. scott fitzgerald world war 1 ww1 first world war great war

"I am restless. I hate the kitchen table at which I am writing. I lose patience over a book. I should like to push the landscape aside as if it irritated me. I must get [back] to the Front. I must again hear the shells roaring up into the sky and the desolate valley echoing the sound. I must return to my Company - live again in the realm of death."
-

Helmut Zschulte, November 1917

from Peter Vansittart’s Voices From The Great War

world war 1 ww1 first world war great war

"Flowers bloom everywhere and we have just come up to the trenches for a time and where I sit now in the reserve line the place is just joyous, the dandelions are bright gold over the parapet and nearby a lilac bush is breaking into bloom; in a wood passed through on our way up, a place with an evil name, pitted and pocked with shells the trees torn to shreds, often reeking with poison gas - a most desolate ruinous place two months back, today it was a vivid green; the most broken trees even had sprouted somewhere and in the midst, from the depth of the wood’s bruised heart poured out the throbbing song of a nightingale. Ridiculous mad incongruity! One can’t think which is the more absurd, the War or Nature…"
- Paul Nash, March 1917

world war 1 ww1 first world war great war paul nash

Does it matter?—losing your legs?…
For people will always be kind.
And you need not show that you mind
When the others come in after hunting
To gobble their muffins and eggs.

Does it matter?—losing your sight?…
There’s such splendid work for the blind;
And people will always be kind,
As you sit on the terrace remembering
And turning your face to the light.

Do they matter?—those dreams from the pit?…
You can drink and forget and be glad,
And people won’t say that you’re mad;
For they’ll know you’ve fought for your country
And no one will worry a bit.

Siegfried Sassoon

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